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Press

“…The first go around on any album is like an awkward first date. You just need to have one more to see if its a good fit.

And it was.

The key to listening to The Employees is turning the volume up!

They are a psychedelic rock/jam band out of Chicago. There are loads of guitar solos that just make your spine tingle. It left me no doubt that they could put one hell of a show on live.The four-piece band led by Chris Bobowiec on the vocals, covers the depression of the economy, corruption in politics/big business, environmental disasters, unemployment, the death of the American dream.Some how they manage to cover all that in only 10 tracks, that’s a talented band I say.  One of my favorite tracks on the album is “Winter Round Here,” “Panic” is another good one. It’s got a nice melody and will definitely have you singing along to it if you’ve got a few beers in you.They may be new on the music work’s force, but they definitely deserved to be hired (sorry, couldn’t help myself).”

-Aldo  Singer

Independent Media Magazine

http://www.indiemediamag.com/2012/music/album-review-unemployed-by-the-employees/

                                                                                                                        

“The idea of the blue-collar workingman, married to his high-school sweetheart, clocking overtime at the mill, battling gout and a herniated disc no longer exists. We now have a generation of mercenary “synergizers” and legions of service industry professionals. The Employees have given them a soundtrack.

The Employees are a rock’n’roll band with a modern psychedelic edge and an agenda. It’s that simple. In my humble opinion, a much more needed gasp of air than any pseudo-social-change acoustic track can hope to provide.

The band has held on to the what remains standard of rock and alternative sounds, with a fuller and more contemporary license, used that to take on some of the more topical news items of the day, i.e. #Occupy, economic depression, and the disparage of the world in general. But, not without a sense of humor, of course.  Nothing is overproduced. Nothing is oversaturated. The sound The Employees provide is about as pure as one can get in this world of compression and digitization.

The bottom line is this – if you’re into rock and had ever had to scrub a coffee stain out of a work shirt – this is the band you need to check out.”

– Christian Krauspe, from CraveOnline.com

                                                                                                                        

“Unemployed is the follow up concept album to The Employee’s “See the Shadow.” On Unemployed, The Employee’s delve into the ideas of the death of the American dream and the corrupt and paranoid state of our country. While these are pretty heavy ideals to begin with, the band does a good job of blending them into the music so you can be enlightened by the lyrics but also enjoy just rocking out to some good music. The band is loud. I will say that again, the band is LOUD! Not a distorted messy loud but a “I wish I could turn up my volume more” loud. The Employees have a raw but clean sound that really brings every tune to life and demands every bit of volume your stereo can muster. The album delivers big guitars and big drums with vocals that drive it all home. Unemployed has a lot to offer for any kind of music lover out there. You want to rock? check out songs like “Oh no!” and “Island”. Need a breather from the hard stuff? Check out songs like “Rumor” or “Winter Round Here.” No matter what you’re in the mood for Unemployed has what you’re looking for. The Employees are based just outside Chicago and perform all over in and out of the city. If you’re in the area I highly recommend you check out their website for dates of upcoming shows. If you can’t get enough volume out of your headphones while listening to Unemployed, the band can deliver all the volume you can handle and more at a live show. Unemployed is a must listen album and if you can, a must see as well.”

By Patrick Beil From Planet Arbitrary   (http://planetarbitrary.com)

Link to review – http://planetarbitrary.com/2012/02/album-review-the-employees-unemployed/#comment-2730

                                                                                                                        

“The Employees are a psychedelic-rock-indie band hailing from Chicago, USA. Their latest album “Unemployed” is due for release in spring 2012.

Background:

Through my endeavors on Youtube.com, I get to “virtually meet” a lot of musicians and lesser-known bands. They watch my videos and notice that I am promoting music which is topical and, most importantly in these “internet censorship” days, not covered by copyright.

Through contact on Youtube we then collaborate – I add their music in my videos, and of course credit them and add a link to their website – and they of course allow me to add their oh-so-appropriate and original music to my videos.

I was very pleased to recently be contacted by The Employees. I have used one of their songs (“Part of the 99”) in my latest video and they very kindly gave me a link to download their latest and great album “Unemployed” which will be released soon.

 About the band:

The Employees are a psychedelic-indie-rock band that was started back in 2007 by Brothers Chris and Ryan. The band released their first full length album, “See the shadow” in 2008. After a few years of playing around the city of Chicago promoting this album, the band started to shift its thoughts to the next release, and trying something different.

In 2010 the band’s focus started becoming more involved with politics and revolution, as the band comes from possibly the most corrupt city in the USA, Chicago.  The news on TV was dominated by corruption, unemployment, the BP oil spill, higher gas prices, and people demanding political change. Band practices were becoming more and more political discussions rather than jamming. This turned The Employees’ focus on to writing music with a real message.

Lead singer Chris B., started to write lyrics inspired by the current headlines in the news that were often political in nature. The band felt like there were more people out there with their thoughts, ideas, and concerns for the future of their country and the world.

From this came the birth of the album “Unemployed”. Instead of just releasing a “collection of songs” written by different members of the band, The Employees all got involved and decided to experiment with the “concept album” idea. Most of the grim headlines inspiring the songs for this album, all pointed to a central idea – “the death of the American Dream”.

 The concept album “Unemployed”:

The music is meaningful and topical for our current revolutionary and crisis-ridden world. It carries a strong message. It tells a story. Plus, of course, it has a great beat!

All the way through, you are reminded of what is happening in the world – politics, corruption and lies. The music encourages you to stand up for your rights, to do your best to change this world. The album tells a strong story in song, which carries through from beginning to end.

This politically charged concept album will be sure to make a statement on the current status in the USA and provide an anthem for change.

The band is planning to have the album Unemployed available on April 17th (Tax Deadline day)!

The Employees also teamed up with political cartoonist Cameron Cardow for the artwork of this concept album.  Cardow is a six-time finalist for Canada’s National Newspaper Award and two-time winner. His cartoons have been published in the New York Times, L.A. Times, USA Today and many others.

 Part of the 99

While finishing up recording their concept album, Unemployed, the Occupy movement started, which got the attention of the band. Unemployed contained some of the messages of the occupy movement without the band knowing it at first. This led the band to write a song in honor of the movement and they produced “Part of the 99” (video below).”

By Anne Sewell Digital Journal

http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/320694